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January 7, 2005

The Cost of Returning the Environment to its "Natural" State

Bodies of adults and children lie in mass grave near Wat Bang Muang Friday, Jan. 7, 2005, in Takuapa, Thailand. More than 5,000 people are listed dead in Thailand following a massive tsunami that struck the popular tourist area in southern Thailand on Dec. 26, 2004. More than 4,000 people are still listed missing in Thailand in the disaster. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)This story from the AP disturbingly shows how some value the environment in its "natural" state more than they value human life.

PATONG BEACH, Thailand - Many believe the tsunami that devastated this tourist hotspot and killed thousands had one positive side: By washing away rampant development, it returned the beaches to nature.
Greg Ferrando glistened with sweat and sea water as he went for a barefoot jog up the immaculate white sand beach, where the tsunami has wiped away almost all signs of humanity.
"This whole area was littered with commercialism," said the 43-year-old from Maui, Hawaii. "There were hundreds of beach chairs out here. I prefer the sand."

See... the world is better now. It's just like King Greg Ferrando wants it (never mind that there were thousands killed).

And then there is this little gem:

"They were just building and building and building. It was too much. You couldn't even walk around," said Moriel Avital, a 24-year-old Israeli who lived on the island for four months.
"It was all gone in one wave — it's telling people not to mess with nature," she said. "Paradise should be paradise and should not become this civilized."

Now if Moriel's house was completely destroyed and her family members killed by a natural disaster, she might have a different outlook on such events. But the majority of those killed by the tsunami in the area she references were just poor Thai villagers... so what does it matter to her. She now gets to enjoy her vision of paradise, which is clearly more important than those lost in the mass grave below.

An unidentified Thai man stares at a mass grave site while searching for a family member near Wat Bang Muang Friday, Jan. 7, 2005, in Takuapa, Thailand. More than 5,000 people are listed dead in Thailand following a massive tsunami that struck the popular tourist area in southern Thailand on Dec. 26, 2004. More than 4,000 people are still listed missing in Thailand in the disaster. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)

Sickening.

Posted by Peter Mork at January 7, 2005 1:42 PM

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» "There were hundreds of beach chairs out here. I prefer the sand." from tomgpalmer.com
Peter Mork has an interesting link and comment on those who see a silver lining to the Indian Ocean tsunami that swept hundreds of thousands to their deaths and left even more destitute.... [Read More]

Tracked on January 8, 2005 11:37 AM

» Boy, that's subtle. from chattr +a -V
This fellow sounds like a character from one of Rand's stories: PATONG BEACH, Thailand - Many believe the tsunami that devastated this tourist hotspot and killed thousands had one positive side: By washing away rampant development, it returned... [Read More]

Tracked on January 8, 2005 1:13 PM

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